How to build retirement wealth

If you are a new reader here, perhaps it’s time for an introduction. I like sharing my opinions on how I am building retirement wealth. I also like to document how my own investments are doing. Some of these ideas might sound outrageous or in contradiction to what you’ve heard from your financial planner, financial adviser, or some popular radio hosts.

But the concepts I lay out in my articles are backed up by historical evidence. In fact, I look at history to try and determine the best ways to build wealth. Do you know how you always hear “past returns are no guarantee of future returns”? While true that there is no guarantee, trying to shirk the past and it’s strong evidence is reckless and frankly won’t lead to a good retirement.

So what are the investment vehicles I employ?

  • No mutual funds.
  • No 401K or IRA wrappers.
  • Direct ownership of stocks (not mutual funds).
  • Leveraged real estate
  • Over funded cash value life insurance (also known as permanent life insurance)
  • Build wealth using various forms of arbitrage

These may the types of vehicles I use, but it also includes the concept of actively managed wealth building. Some of these vehicles may be considered passive forms of income, but it takes an active approach to do it right. The concept of simply dumping money into a mutual fund inside your 401K and assuming it will grow to serve you in retirement just doesn’t work.

No mutual funds

The Dalbar report has been monitoring mutual funds and tax deferred savings plans for 20 years. According to the 2013 report, mutual fund investors have significantly underperformed the S&P 500 over the past 3, 5, 10 and 20 years. In 2012, they reported the average performance of investors in equity funds was 4.25%. They further indicate that this is mostly tied to investor behavior rather than fund performance.

The performance numbers are clear: people investing in mutual funds average poorly. Dalbar goes on to make a judgment that it’s the consumer’s fault. This might or might not be a valid judgment. But is that relevant? If people don’t do well, and haven’t been for 20 years, do I really want to plan my retirement under the assumption that I can beat the average? I’m sure it’s what most others think. Dave Ramsey is happy to quote the FDIC in saying that 97.3% of people don’t follow through on their promise to pay off a 30-year mortgage in just 15 years with extra payments.

So why would we expect people to follow through on their attempt to not buy when things rise and sell when a market correction hits? I prefer to build my wealth building plans using the averages.

No 401K or IRA wrappers

401K and other government wrappers come with an incredible entanglement of regulations, restrictions, and other tricks to basically keep your hands off the money. The concept is to get you to put away money and keep your hands off of it until you reach retirement age. But many investment houses take advantage of this situation in the sense that mutual funds and other vehicles available tend to have the highest expense ratios.

People will eagerly point out things like IRAs as giving you more control, but the government has strong limits on how much you can put into an IRA. Suffice it to say, the limits on IRAs aren’t enough to build a retirement plan.

And do you really think the government designed the 401K to help you set aside money and save on taxes? The government wants you to put away money today without paying any taxes, so that you will grow the money into something bigger, and then start paying full blown income taxes when you reach retirement. Yikes!

It’s true that I have a Roth IRA and a 401K, but that is money I put in before I realized it wasn’t working. As you’ll see below, most of that money has been re-applied and is already making way more than what it used to. The only money I have left is trapped in my current company’s 401K and I can’t get to it. The Roth IRA I have is small as well and would serve little benefit if I extracted it.

Direct ownership of stocks

This one really stuns some people that I meet. I don’t like the dismal performance of mutual funds combined with their fees. Instead, I prefer owning stocks directly. If you look at all the studies done over the years, there is one stock market strategy that has proved fruitful: buying and holding dividend-paying stocks.

If you look at people like Warren Buffett, they have created billions by acquiring strong companies when they were on sale. Warren Buffett has also bought cash flowing stocks and companies, and reinvested their proceeds in other strong companies. This has created a compounding affect that has let him beat the S&P500 for years by great margins. The book value of Berkshire Hathaway has averaged it’s growth by 28% during the boom years, and by as much as 18% during bad recessionary times.

It’s not hard to find solid companies. In fact, there are many blog sites dedicated to this, such as Dividend Mantra and Dividend Growth Investor. The companies they invest in are not fly-by-night shady outfits. Instead, they mention thinks like Coca-Cola (KO), Walmart (WMT), and other names you’ll recognize. Companies like Coca-Cola have created millionaires for decades. You can find a list of companies that have paid consistent dividends, increasing them year after year, for over 25 years. It’s not that hard. It turns out, these are some of the best investments regarding inflation. A company that has managed to increase payouts to its shareholders through thick and thin is pretty solid.

Leveraged real estate

After the 2008 housing melt down, many people won’t entertain investing in real estate. The problem is that newspapers were reporting the worst scenarios regarding foreclosures. The truth is, 99% of mortgages are current and paid for. The number of people that suffered rate hikes on risky loans while having insufficient money to keep up were a fraction of a percent.

Real estate has shown a more consistent growth rate than mutual funds. And real estate is one of the easiest investments for middle class people to get into. Using prudent leverage, an average 4-5% growth can turn into 20-25% growth in your investment capital. That certainly beats the 4.25% average growth of mutual funds. Again, this is what happens if you use the averages. You can make more and take on riskier, higher paying options, but why take a risk? You’re already ahead of what mutual funds in 401K wrappers have to offer.

Since real estate was a no brainer, I cashed out my 13-year-old 401K from my old company, paid 37% in taxes and penalties that year, and used it to buy two duplexes with 20% and 25% down. I couldn’t be happier.

The rentals I own are paying me a nice monthly profit as the tenants pay off the mortgages for me. I keep a fair amount of cash in reserve to handle vacancies. And seeing my property yield monthly cash helps me to focus on that instead of pure growth in value.

Over funded cash value life insurance

This is one that stirs a lot of discussion. People have been preached to that cash value life insurance is a rip off and to never, ever, ever buy it! Phrases like “buy term and invest the difference” as well as “don’t mix insurance with investments” flies all over the place.

The thing is, many of the people that preach this opinion have an incomplete knowledge of how it works and how it was designed to function.

To be clear, I’m talking about EIULs, or equity indexed universal life insurance. And the critical component is over funding the policy to the limit set by the IRS. Essentially, buy a policy where you get the minimum amount of death benefit for a given amount of money. That causes your cash value to build faster. If you get the maximum amount of death benefit, then your cash value grows very slowly and it becomes an ineffective tool in storing wealth.

EIULs that are over funded give you the option down the road to borrow from the cash value. Essentially, you borrow money (without paying it back) and when you die, the loan is paid off with the death benefit. Whatever is left over is passed on to your beneficiaries.

EIULs have the benefit on not investing in the stock market, but instead in European options on the market. This is how they institute caps such that your principle is guaranteed to growth somewhere between 0% and 15% of the index it is linked to. If the index goes negative, your cash value stays the same. But if the market goes positive, so does your cash value.

You may not be aware, but that facet is incredibly powerful when it comes to wealth preservation. So many people have seen huge booms in their mutual fund holdings, but the overall performance is knocked back to that Dalbar average of 4.25% due to losses. If your account shrinks by 30% in one year, and then grows by 30% the following year, are back to where you started? Nope. $10,000 would drop to $7,000 and then grow back to $9,100. But if you had an EIUL, that $10,000 would stay put, and then grow to $11,500 (0% loss followed by a 15% gain based on the caps).

EIULs are very expensive for the first ten years; a fact many people like to point out such as Suze Orman and Dave Ramsey. But after ten years, the fees drop to almost nothing. After twenty years, the fees will probably average between 0.5-1.5%/year. Sure beats the 2-4% average cost of mutual funds. And then you get to start taking out tax free loans (compared to mutual fund payments at income tax rates), there is even less to fret about in retirement.

Once I understood the entire picture of what EIULs could and couldn’t do, it was a simple decision to stop investing money in my company 401K and reroute that money into an EIUL.

Build wealth using various forms of arbitrage

Something people are unaware of is how banks make money. Banks borrow money from the Federal Reserve at rates like 3.25% and then turn around and lend it out at 4.25%, pocketing the 1% difference. You can use the same concept.

I took out a HELOC against my home for (PRIME-0.25%) with a floor of 4%, so right now, it costs me 4% to get this money. Then I bought a position in Vanguard Natural Resources, an MLP that has been paying 9% distributions on a monthly basis. As I pay off the HELOC, I am essentially pocketing the 5% difference.

This is also referred to as equity harvesting. All that equity in my house was earning 0%. I am getting the cheapest form of money available, a mortgage, and using it to collect cash flowing assets. After I pay off the HELOC, I can redirect the money towards paying off investment mortgages, buying other dividend aristocrat stocks for even more passive income cash flows, or increase my position in Vanguard Natural Resources. And at that point, I can also renew the HELOC to get more investment capital.

When people ask “would you take out a $50,000 loan on your house and invest it?” my answer is a resounding “yes!”

Stay tuned

I hope you enjoyed this introduction to the concepts of build wealth at the Wealth Building Society. Wealth building isn’t hard, but when you boil things down to sound bites used by radio entertainers, some of the worst advice gets out there. Are the people that are telling you to only take out 15 year mortgages and pay them off as fast possible retiring on mutual funds? Are these people maxing out 401K and IRAs, or are they building wealth through writing books, running TV and radio shows, and piping their business equity pay offs into rental property?

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