Financial math often isn’t straightforward

wealthWhen you decide to pick up the gauntlet of investing for retirement and step away from passively throwing money into your company’s 401K plan, you may enter a perplexing world. Don’t be afraid!

For starters, you might start visiting lots and LOTS of websites looking for opinions. Be aware: many people can and will state opinions wrapped in feel-good language like “think about…it makes sense”. It doesn’t make it right. That’s why you need to learn how to drive a spreadsheet and crunch numbers on a calculator.

The only way to really deduce if they are right is to do the math yourself. This might involve either using a calculator or a spreadsheet. Another tool to have at your beck and call is a mortgage calculator.

Let me pick one example. I have a primary residence, a vacation residence, and four rental properties. They all have mortgages. So what do you do if you stumble across a surplus of cash? Try googling “pay off mortgage early” and you’ll find loads of opinions. People often suggest paying off your primary residence first. Many will state it is way more important than paying off rental mortgages. They’ll probably mention a dozen different reasons.

But simply put, your permanent residence doesn’t yield cash. The only way to get that money back is to SELL your permanent residence. You ready for that? In my situation, no. I’m not moving anytime soon. Sinking any extra of today’s dollars would be flat out stupid.

The plan is to knock out the rental loans as fast as possible to make it an option to liquidate a unit when the time if right. That combined with the accelerated depreciation I’ve set up will generate the biggest bang for the buck.

A finer point in this example is exactly how various pay off scenarios impact the bottom line. Currently, I’m piping extra rent towards the smallest rental mortgage every month. I’m interested in throwing a one time payment against it next month. What impact would it have?

Learn how to drive a spreadsheet and a mortgage calculator

Like the title says, some things just aren’t intuitive. I found a mortgage calculator that includes the ability to add extra on a monthly, annual, and one time basis. The extra monthly amount I’ve been paying is bringing the pay off date from 2042 in to 2020. Nice! What does my tentative single payment next month do? It pulls the payoff date in six months. What?!?! I thought it would have a bigger impact. It doesn’t. The question arises: is this the best usage of such money?

This discovery also raises the question about what if I could make an annual contribution to the rental mortgage? I began to go down my laundry list of extra sources of cash. The two I can think of is using one of my 6-month bonus checks or one of my 6-month ESPP options. The bonus check is currently used to fund my vacation property. But what if I routed one of my two ESPP checks into that rental property? I hastily punched it into the mortgage calculator in lieu of the one time contribution. I see the payoff date move up to 2017, just three years away. That’s more like it!

I’m planning to have a review of everything with Jeff Brown. I’m going to tell him that I can pipe extra cash annually, or even twice a year courtesy of my ESPP. Who knows? Maybe I need one of them to pay for insurance and taxes. One question I have for him is whether or not it really makes sense to put that single lump sum payment on the loan, or perhaps use it to beef up my cash reserves.

To top things off, I used the same calculator to find out where my second smallest rental mortgage would be in 2017, and calculated when it would pay off assuming I apply all the rent from the first unit. Answer: 2020! So, with extra rent added on a monthly basis minus one mortgage payment and throwing in a chunk of ESPP once-a-year, I can pay off the first loan in five years, and the second one three years after that. Estimating the 3rd and 4th units is probably absurd at this point, because there is too much variance that can happen in the next eight years. But I can only imagine that pointing the rent from four units with only two mortgage payments will be grand.

Circling back to the original topic at hand: you need to understand some fundamental concepts and when to use the right calculators. Plug numbers into a spreadsheet on an annual basis, and see how the balance of your loan drops based on paying the minimum vs. an increased monthly/annual/one-time amount. Also consider how you would get your hands on that cash down the road, and think about what you would do with the money at that stage. Buy more rentals? Stocks? Fund another EIUL?

Kicking around some ideas? Send me a message and I’ll be happy to discuss things with you.

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